In The News

Read the latest news about scientific breakthroughs, clinical findings and special events benefiting neurofibromatosis research.

Researchers Discover New Treatments for NF1 Optic Glioma

Children with Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) develop optic gliomas which can cause reduced vision. Currently, treatments for these brain tumors involve...

Researchers Identify New Genetic Risk Factor for NF1-Associated Glioma

A new study, spearheaded by Dr. Joshua Rubin and his colleagues, found that subtle changes in the genes of children...

Understanding the Impact of Co-existing Genetic Mutations on Optic Glioma Growth

One of the most common tumors seen in children with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is the optic pathway glioma, a...

New Drug Shows Promise for NF1 Plexiform Neurofibromas

Plexiform neurofibromas are common benign nerve tumors seen in children and adults with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). While these tumors...

Advanced Genetic Methods Reveal New Roles for Immune System Cells in Brain Disease

One of the most abundant cell types in brain tumors are immune system-like cells called microglia. These cells perform a...

Understanding the Diverse Clinical Features of Neurofibromatosis Type 1

Individuals with Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) are more likely to develop benign and malignant tumors of the nervous system. In...

Study Reveals Neuronal Dysfunction Pathway in NF1

Over 60% of children with NF1 have learning, attention and behavioral delays, leading researchers to believe that the NF1 gene...

Study Finds Elevated Risk of Neurological Conditions in Individuals with NF1

Researchers in the Washington University NF Center recently utilized the largest US private health insurance claims database to examine the...

Washington University NF Center Awarded 2014 ALSF Innovation Grant

Investigators in The Washington University NF Center were awarded a 2014 Innovation Grant from Alex’s Lemonade Stand Foundation (ALSF). This...

Dr. Gutmann: Making Science Work for Patients

The following article originally appeared in Lancet Neurology in August 2014 and was written by Sheila M. Thorn. Thank goodness for...